One Middle Tennessee school is helping students with learning differences thrive in the classroom.

Students like 7-year-old Ethan can follow arrows and footsteps in the sensory hallway that has been added to the Edison School in Gallatin.

"We've got kids that have anxiety just being around other students. We have kids that, when they're learning, they need to be up and moving, so sitting in a traditional classroom's not gonna work for them," said Dr. John Wilson, head of the school.

Wilson saw videos of a similar hallway concept in Canada, and he brought it to life here.

All students at the school use this hallway at some point between classes, and teachers are noticing a big difference.

"They're definitely more focused, they're more engaged in what they're doing. If they had any fidgety-ness beforehand, that's gone," said Upper Schol teacher Jordan Reed.

Ethan's mother, Lesley Redman, said the hallway has made a world of difference for her son.

"That just gives them the distraction from what was going on in the classroom, and it gives them time to even decompress some before they even make it to the room," she said.

Redman said she'd love to see something like this in every school to benefit more children.

So far, Wilson's Facebook post on the sensory hallway is getting lots of traction. Within just days, it has been viewed 185,000 times.

Copyright 2019 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Anchor

Holly Thompson is the co-anchor of News4 Today and anchors News4 at Noon. She joined News4 in June 1997.

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