Lindsay Bramson joined News4 in June 2016 as an investigative reporter. She currently specializes in consumer issues.

The News4 I-Team gets results.

Changes are being made at the Amazon facility in Murfreesboro after our investigation.

Last month we told you an employee died and some employees say equipment that could have saved his life didn’t work.

According to several employees, once our story aired Amazon fixed radios that were broken. And these radios are what they can use to call for help in an emergency.

Remember, due to policy they aren't allowed to have their cell phones on them. But we’ve also learned even more steps have been taken to make it safer for those who work there.

In a 911 call obtained by News4 the dispatcher asks, "Is the patient breathing at this time or still unresponsive? No,” says the caller.

When Mike Gellasch had a heart attack at work, some employees say they couldn't find a working radio to call for help.

"They've always been an issue. Always. Since day 1,” said one employee.

The radios look like this.

And several employees came to News4 after they say if they could've called for help sooner, Gellasch may still be alive today.

“The lady said she tried to get on the radio. The radios don't work,” said another employee.

Several workers tell the I-Team after our story aired, Amazon fixed the radios.

We also found out even more steps have been taken to make it easier to call for help.

In this email, an Amazon spokeswoman confirms the company has "implemented a one-button calling feature on phones to allow direct dialing to the on-site medical representative. Adding, "At Amazon we are constantly looking for ways to improve processes that help keep associates safe and improve the daily working environment."

We also told you it took an estimated 5 minutes for someone to call 911 after Gellasch collapsed. That's according to the ambulance report obtained by the I-Team.

And when someone finally did call 911, the dispatcher was put on hold.

"Lord, he just put me on hold,” said the dispatcher in a 911 call.

These workers say they're happy to see changes being made so that hopefully something like this never happens again.

Amazon released a statement in response to our News4 I-Team report:

We can’t emphasize enough that the safety of our associates is our number one priority. At Amazon we are constantly looking for ways to improve processes that help keep associates safe and improve the daily working environment. The Murfreesboro team has worked with associates to ensure they know how to respond in the event of an emergency and have implemented a one-button calling feature on phones to allow direct dialing to the on-site medial representative.

Copyright 2018 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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