A Nashville woman overcame her battle with chronic pain, without painkillers.

Jenn Dobbins never thought she’d find herself here, sitting wheelchair-free in the Vanderbilt Osher Center with her 17-month-year-old girl in her lap.

“It was a very freak accident,” she said of the day a glass vase crushed her foot 12 years ago. “It wasn't until about two years into the process that we realized I had a separate pain condition.”

Her condition is called complex regional pain syndrome.

“There were months I couldn't get out of bed and my husband had to carry me to the bathroom because I couldn't walk at all,” she recalled. “Every doctor we'd ever seen had said absolutely not. Don't have a baby, it's so dangerous.”

For years treatments and painkillers didn’t work. Doctors told her there was nothing else she could do.

Then she found the Osher Center.

“Being here gave me quality of life that I never thought I would get again,” Dobbins said.

She undergoes aqua, physical, and occupational therapy, and hypnosis on a regular basis.

“A lot of people have misconceptions about hypnosis,” Dr. Lindsey McKernan explained. “The ability to experience a reduction in pain is about 30 percent, which is equivalent to what people experience with opioids.”

Now Dobbins, a new mother, lives medication free.

“Knowing that there’s hope is something I wish I had when I got sick.”

Copyright 2018 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Reporter

Rebecca Cardenas is a Murrow-award winning journalist who joined News4 as a reporter in September 2017.

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