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Mayor releases 'Roadmap' to reopen Nashville

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Poll: What do you think of the mayor's plan to reopen Nashville?

The mayor released a "road map" to reopen Nashville and get people back to work. We want to hear your thoughts about it.

You voted:

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) - The mayor has released a "road map" to reopening the city of Nashville and getting people back to work as they continue to live with COVID-19. 

Mayor John Cooper released a 14-page plan, which includes four phases for reopening the city. Before moving to the next phase, there must be "positive improvement/stability in the metrics for 14 days," Cooper said. 

Cooper said the reopening of the city will be "data driven, note date driven." He did not release when the reopening of the city would start.

"We're working toward Phase One reopening now," Cooper said.

He added that the Tennessee Major Metro Reopening Task Force has been working for the past week on developing a coordinated plan.

PHASE ONE

In Phase One, Cooper is advising anyone over the age 65 and those who are deemed high risk to stay at home. He also advised people to continue to work from home whenever possible. All residents were advised to wear masks in public, schools would be closed, and there should be no gatherings over 10.  

Restaurants and bars serving food would be able to reopen at half-capacity with bar areas closed and no live music. Healthcare and dental will resume with routine and elective procedures under 70 years old. Employees for those organizations would be screened daily and must wear masks. 

"All of the businesses - and I'm very active in the retail and commercial business units within the city," banker Rob McCabe is chairman of the Nashville Chamber of Commerce, said. "They are already preparing for reopening. They have their own protocols, their own sense of safety measures that are appropriate for their employees and their customers. so they have active plans."

The following locations would be closed in Phase One

  • Bars, Entertainment Venues
  • Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc.
  • Gyms and Fitness
  • Playgrounds,tennis and basketball courts
  • Sports Venues

PHASE TWO 

In Phase Two, Cooper once again advises anyone over the age 65 and those who are deemed high risk to stay at home. He also advised people to continue to work from home whenever possible, all residents were advised to wear masks in public and schools to remain closed.

However, gatherings such as meetings, religious services, weddings, etc., should be limited to 50 people.

Restaurants and bars serving food would be able to reopen at three-quarters capacity, but bar areas would remain closed and there would be no live music.

Healthcare and dental routine and elective procedures will be available for all age groups. Employees for those organizations would be screened daily and must wear masks. 

Hair and nail salons as well as massage parlors will be open by appointment only, however there will be no walk-ins. Only 10 staff and customers will be allowed in the building at a time.

Bars and entertainment venues as well as gyms and fitness centers and sports venue will remain closed. 

PHASE THREE

Poll: What do you think of the mayor's plan to reopen Nashville?

The mayor released a "road map" to reopen Nashville and get people back to work. We want to hear your thoughts about it.

You voted:

In Phase Three, nonresidential K-12 schools can reopen and gatherings will be limited to 100 people.

Restaurants and bars serving food would be able to reopen at full capacity, bar areas will be able to open at 50 percent capacity, and live music will be permitted. 

Retail stores, commercial businesses, gyms, fitness centers as well as playgrounds, tennis courts, and basketball courts will be fully opened with people still observing social distancing. However, sport venues will remain closed in Phase Three.

Bars and entertainment venues will be able to open at 50 percent capacity and that will include tours, museums and theaters. 

Once again, hair and nail salons as well as massage parlors will be open by appointment only, however there will be no walk-ins. Only 10 staff and customers will be allowed in the building at a time.

In Phase Three, all employees will be screened daily and have to wear masks with all equipment be wiped down after each use.

PHASE FOUR

In Phase Four, Cooper is still advising anyone over the age 65 and those who are deemed high risk to stay at home. Working from home and wearing masks in public will be optional, but recommended by the mayor. Gatherings will still be limited to 100 people.

Sport venues, bars, and entertainment venues will join retail stores, commercial businesses, gyms, fitness centers as well as playgrounds, tennis courts and basketball courts open at full capacity with social distancing in mind. 

However, once again, hair and nail salons as well as massage parlors will be open by appointment only. There will be no walk-ins. Only 10 staff and customers will be allowed in the building at a time.

Cooper said there is a chance Nashville "will experience continued outbreaks of COVID-19 that will force us to revert to earlier phases of the plan."

"The more that Nashville residents and businesses follow each phase of the plan carefully, the more we will stay on track and the faster we will get back to business safely," Thursday's release said.Cooper said there is a chance Nashville "will experience continued outbreaks of COVID-19 that will force us to revert to earlier phases of the plan."

The mayor released the following goals and the metrics prior to reopening Nashville.

  • Disease transmission under control - Sustained decrease in cases maintained for 14 days
  • Detect every case 1 test per 100-150 residents per week; results within 24 hours
  • Isolate every case Interview cases within 1 day of test results. Capacity to contact cases daily and support isolation at home or alternate location established.
  • Trace every contact Close contacts interviewed within 2 days of case report. Capacity to support quarantine at home or alternate location established.
  • Sources of exposure identified and preventive measured instituted Case interviews identify likely source of exposure, and prevention plan developed for identified “hot spots”
  • Risk of importing new cases can be “managed” Healthcare facilities have written plans for managing expected patients and sufficient PPE, beds, ventilators based on best available local models. Report to State twice weekly available equipment/facilities.
  • Schools, workplaces, healthcare facilities have established preventive measures - Written plans that specify training, screening, and medical leave policies for employees. Plans should include procedures for interacting safely with customers including maintaining hygiene, minimizing close contact, and screening protocols such as temperature checks.
  • Communities are fully educated, engaged and empowered to live under a new normal Compliance with new normal monitored by mobility reports and exposure histories of new cases. Cloth masks are to be widely utilized by all citizens outside their residences to reduce spread of disease.

Nashville is currently conducting 5,000 tests per week. 

Cooper said triggers that will cause city officials to re-install “Stay at Home Orders” will closely consider the strain on local hospitals.

"Adequate testing capacity is necessary to allow employers overseeing vulnerable populations, such as health care facilities, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and jails to be vigilant in monitoring for COVID-19," release said.  

Metro Public Health confirmed a total of 2,144 cases of coronavirus in Davidson County. This was an increase of 182 cases in the past 24 hours. There have been 22 deaths reported in Davidson County.

Doctor Alex Jahangir said right now, most of the metrics to get back to reopening looks good and if things stay that way, Phase One of getting back to business can happen in very early May. 

Vanderbilt University Medical Center said the mayor "proposed a well-informed plan."

“The plan relies on key metrics to drive decisions to move between phases rather than a prescribed timeline, and also provides appropriate milestones as checks and balances for supporting public safety while advancing economic activity,” Jeff Balser, who is the President and CEO of Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dean of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said in a statement on Thursday.

To review the full documents, click here.

 

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