Feature Reporter

Terry Bulger has been bringing you stories of the people and places that make Tennessee unique and interesting on News4 since 1990.

Dealing with any government agency can be frustrating, even if you have a little problem that's super annoying.

A dog barking every morning in your neighborhood, or even a leaky fire hydrant on your street.

But who do you call?

City hall says dial 311

Many folks we asked didn't know what 311 was. For Metro residents, those three little numbers dialed on your phone could be the answer to all your problems, at least the problems that Nashville's City Hall can handle.

Annoying problems can include why the buses aren't running on time, or if those traffic lights just aren't synced up right, or if anybody is ever gonna fill that pothole. Even something as simple as the grass needs cutting at Centennial Park.

Call 311 and politely complain. It's a catch-all for everything that isn't an emergency.

Re-named Hub Nashville two years ago, it seems to be working. 311 gets 7,000 calls a month, 200 calls per day.

It's not new. The city says people should learn it and use it, never wanting to hear this exchange again:

"Are you familiar with 311?"

"Absolutely not, never heard of it."

Now let's be realistic, if you call 311 don't expect sirens blaring and guys with shovels headed to your neighborhood to fill a pothole.

Remember, it's not an emergency. Metro just wants it to be an easier way for you and them to get things done.

Copyright 2019 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.