NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) - A Metro Parks Board subcommittee decided on Monday to add signs that give context to a Confederate memorial statue in Centennial Park.

The debate at Monday’s meeting comes at a time when the appropriateness of Confederate statues is being discussed state wide.

Ron Hartley of the AMVETS legislative task force told the board “history is history.” He pointed out the monument in question was placed at its current location over 100 years ago not as an afront to show insensitivity or as a deliberate act of disrespect, but to honor brave Tennesseans who fought and died defending their homes, farms and families.

Krista Castillo, a historian at Fort Negley, agreed with the ide of adding a sign that gives context to the statue.

She said the statue was put up during Jim Crow days in the early 1900x while Centennial Park was segregated.

The Public Arts subcommittee moved to forward a recommendation to the full Parks Board that the statue remains, but with a sign that gives historical context.

Historical statues are protected by state law.

WSMV.com is now with you on the go! Get the latest news updates and video, 4WARN weather forecast, weather radar, special investigative reports, sports headlines and much more from News4 Nashville.

>> Click/tap here to download our free mobile app. <<


Copyright 2019 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Reporter

Nancy Amons is an award-winning member of the News4 Investigates team. She has been breaking stories in Middle Tennessee for more than 20 years.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.