Families across the midstate are not only finding health through fresh produce, but also fulfillment in working with the earth. These families are on display at your local farmers’ market each week, where they sell fresh produce that’s grown locally and consumed locally.

The Geny family operates Paradise Produce Farm 17 miles north of Nashville. They don’t own the four acres they farm, because land is too expensive for them to afford in today’s economic climate. They’ve been able to live their passion thanks to a co-op effort at By Faith Farm, where they share the land with a cattle farmer and a beekeeper.

“We’re changing our mindset, changing other people’s mindsets about what you can actually do on a small amount of acreage and make a living as a family,” says Sonia Geny, who works the farm with her husband Stacy and their five-year-old son, Wilder. “I love being on the land and walking out getting dinner and taking my kids out, letting them play on the farm. Working together as a family has been a really wonderful blessing.”

Chris Miller with his son at Paradise Produce Farm

Chris Miller with Wilder Geny, son of Paradise Produce Farm owners Sonia and Stacy Geny.

The winter season is plentiful in their hoop houses this December, where the Geny’s are picking fresh lettuce, beets, broccoli, carrots and turnips and selling them at farmers’ markets, or boxing them up for their Community Supported Agriculture Program, where customers can subscribe to receive weekly boxes (www.paradiseproducefarm.com). They also provide donations to Grace Works Ministries.

Working on a small farm allows them to have a lot of control over what they’re growing. Like many small, local farmers, the Geny’s are committed to using all-natural products, with no pesticides no chemicals.

“It’s not going to be 50 cents like at the supermarket, but it’s also not going to taste like plastic either,” says Sonia, who suggests that growing in an environment with minimal artificial additives makes produce taste better.

The family admits it’s a lot of hard work, but they’re finding fulfillment in their lives by working with the earth.

“I like providing a product that people actually need. There are so many things today that are marketed that may have their merit, but not things that people actually need,” says Stacy Geny.

The Geny family and By Faith Farm are inviting any members of the community to partner with them by donating, or volunteering as a gardener, visit: https://www.byfaithfarm.com/ for details.

Families across the midstate are not only finding health through fresh produce, but also fulfillment in working with the earth. These families are on display at your local farmers’ market each week, where they sell fresh produce that’s grown locally and consumed locally.

The Geny family operates Paradise Produce Farm 17 miles north of Nashville. They don’t own the four acres they farm, because land is too expensive for them to afford in today’s economic climate. They’ve been able to live their passion thanks to a co-op effort at By Faith Farm, where they share the land with a cattle farmer and a beekeeper.

“We’re changing our mindset, changing other people’s mindsets about what you can actually do on a small amount of acreage and make a living as a family,” says Sonia Geny, who works the farm with her husband Stacy and their five-year-old son, Wilder. “I love being on the land and walking out getting dinner and taking my kids out, letting them play on the farm. Working together as a family has been a really wonderful blessing.”

The winter season is plentiful in their hoop houses this December, where the Geny’s are picking fresh lettuce, beets, broccoli, carrots and turnips and selling them at farmers’ markets, or boxing them up for their Community Supported Agriculture Program, where customers can subscribe to receive weekly boxes. They also provide donations to Grace Works Ministries.

Working on a small farm allows them to have a lot of control over what they’re growing. Like many small, local farmers, the Geny’s are committed to using all-natural products, with no pesticides no chemicals.

“It’s not going to be 50 cents like at the supermarket, but it’s also not going to taste like plastic either,” says Sonia, who suggests that growing in an environment with minimal artificial additives makes produce taste better.

The family admits it’s a lot of hard work, but they’re finding fulfillment in their lives by working with the earth.

“I like providing a product that people actually need. There are so many things today that are marketed that may have their merit, but not things that people actually need,” says Stacy Geny.

The Geny family and By Faith Farm are inviting any members of the community to partner with them by donating, or volunteering as a gardener. Click here for details.

WSMV.com is now with you on the go! Get the latest news updates and video, 4WARN weather forecast, weather radar, special investigative reports, sports headlines and much more from News4 Nashville.

>> Click/tap here to download our free mobile app. <<


Copyright 2019 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.