Parents share ways to beat the heat ahead of extreme temperatures

More than 67,000 people each year visit the emergency room because of the heat according to CDC data.
More than 67,000 people each year visit the emergency room because of the heat according to CDC data.
Published: Jun. 27, 2023 at 10:28 PM CDT
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) - With high temperatures this week in the Middle Tennessee area, it’s important for people who engage in outside activities to take care of their health by staying hydrated and finding ways to cool down.

A nice summer day brings people to the park, whether they’re out playing sports or sitting in the shade.

“It’s something to do. We’re always outside, so bringing the kids to the park with water blasters is really good because it keeps them cool,” said Ashley Blum.

Blum and Felysha Jenkins sat under a shade tree Tuesday afternoon as their kids played with water blasters on this hot summer day.

“Shade is important, water is important. That’s what I have to do to make sure that we’re staying hydrated,” said Blum.

For Jenkins, making sure her son is safe while playing in the heat is a top priority.

“He always wants to be involved in activities so I try to find activities where there is going to be some shade, some trees, an umbrella,” said Jenkins.

According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 67,000 people each year visit the emergency room because of the heat.

For these two moms, they said they have a choice to endure it. However, their concern is for those who don’t.

“People experiencing homelessness living outdoors, it’s really important that we provide resources for them and be able to get them what they need. Get them water. Taking water in your car we take snacks and water electrolyte drinks for people that we can just give out to folks out the window. Something to do with the kids to learn how to help others,” said Blum.

“Nashville seems to have a lot of people who don’t have homes and I’ll see them on the streets and I’m always thinking, what are they going to do in this heat because it feels very oppressive and do they have places that they can go and what are they going to do,” said Jenkins.

Whether you’re swinging a golf club, reading a book outside or blasting your friends with water, be mindful of how extreme temperatures can affect your health.