Suicide prevention hotlines see uptick in calls following high-p - WSMV News 4

Suicide prevention hotlines see uptick in calls following high-profile deaths

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NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

Following the deaths of famed designer Kate Spade and Parts Unknown host Anthony Bourdain, suicide prevention hotlines nationwide have seen a 65 percent increase in calls.

Incoming calls to the Davidson County Crisis Center have seen an increase as well as people reach out for mental help.

It's the people on the other end of the line who are often the last stop, talking people out of taking one last desperate act.

Experts said talking to someone is the best thing you can do.

The staff at the crisis center for Davidson County is ready to listen.

In a one week period, the crisis center hotline has taken 1,074 calls.

The people who staff the phone banks are trained professional counselors.

Many of the calls they take are from people who have just about given up on life.

Adam Graham, the center’s program director, puts the callers’ desperation in focus.

People need to get by, the pain is so intense, they have tried everything they know to do, to get through it right now, the only option, seems to be this life of unbearable pain, or death," said Graham.

Talking to a counselor is only the first step in the healing process.

"Let’s come up with a plan, let's understand the story, and see what the next step is," said Graham.

Seemingly both Bourdain and Spade had everything to live for, but it's the pain that you can't see that hides below the surface.

"They didn't want to be a burden anymore, so they smile, everything on the surface looks OK, on the inside, there is unending pain. They don't know what to do about it. They don't feel comfortable reaching out so they suffer in silence until it got to the critical point and suicide is on the table," said Graham.

What the counselors at the crisis center try to do first is talk people down from the dark place that dims all hope.

"Since you’re not in that place of pain, you can see a little bit easier, and help walk with them towards that," said Graham.

If you need to talk to someone, you can call the Mental Health Cooperative at 615-726-0125 or 855-274-7471.

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