PulsePoint app aids first responders in Putnam County - WSMV News 4

PulsePoint app aids first responders in Putnam County

Posted: Updated:
The PulsePoint app allows people to immediately respond if they are within a quarter of a mile of someone suffering a heart attack, and notifies them of the locations of AEDs The PulsePoint app allows people to immediately respond if they are within a quarter of a mile of someone suffering a heart attack, and notifies them of the locations of AEDs
COOKEVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

When a loved one is having a heart attack, seconds count. However, it may take minutes for first responders to arrive.  

In the Putnam County 911 Center, they receive about six to eight cardiac calls a day.

Now Putnam 911 is integrating a new app called PulsePoint into their community. The app alerts users trained in CPR when someone nearby is suffering from cardiac arrest. That way they can start performing CPR long before responders arrive.

Anyone with a smartphone can download the app.

“This app allows them to immediately respond if they're within a quarter of a mile, and notifies them of the locations of AEDs,” explains Putnam Co. 911 Director Mike Thompson.

Hope to 75,000 people across 401 square-miles, Putnam Co. is a very large district. 

Emergency officials hope PulsePoint app can help aid response times, adding strength in numbers.

“There are obviously more folks trained in CPR than there are responders,” Thompson said.

Cookeville City Councilman Dr. Chuck Womack helped bring PulsePoint to Putnam Co., after seeing a study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“They found that bystanders working CPR on people suffering cardiac arrest improved 40 percent to 60 percent,” Womack said.

After users download the PulsePoint app, they get notifications about different medical emergencies taking place across Putnam County. There is also an information tab on the side that offers a refresher course on how to perform CPR, as well as how to use an AED.

“It has a metronome to show you how to do (chest compressions) so many times a minute,” Womack said. “But mainly, it gets you there to start doing CPR to keep the brain alive, until someone with a defibrillator can arrive and shock the patient.”

“When someone goes into cardiac arrest, permanent brain damage can occur in four to six minutes," Thompson explained. 

The app only notifies citizen-responders of cardiac arrests in public places. However, there is a version of the app that allows trained and verified first responders to assist with incidents at local residences.

The PulsePoint app not only works just in Putnam County but anywhere in the nation where app users travel. That means, wherever you are, you could help save a life. 

Anyone who is CPR-certified is encouraged to download the app today.

Putman Co. 911 says they hope to get at least 5,000 people in the area to download the app. 

Copyright 2018 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
WSMV
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2018, WSMV; Nashville, TN. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.