Man dies after being shot on MTA bus in Madison - WSMV News 4

Man dies after being shot on MTA bus in Madison

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Metro Police are investigating a shooting on a MTA bus in Madison. (Photo: Metro Nashville Police Department) Metro Police are investigating a shooting on a MTA bus in Madison. (Photo: Metro Nashville Police Department)
Metro Police are investigating a shooting on a MTA bus in Madison. (Photo: Metro Nashville Police Department) Metro Police are investigating a shooting on a MTA bus in Madison. (Photo: Metro Nashville Police Department)
Antonio Jones (Source: Metro Nashville PD) Antonio Jones (Source: Metro Nashville PD)
MADISON, TN (WSMV) -

The man shot on a Metro Transit Authority bus on Monday afternoon in Madison has died, according to Metro police.

Police said 18-year-old Antonio Jones is charged with criminal homicide in the shooting of 18-year-old Tyvonceea Hayden. Police said Jones and Hayden knew each other.

Police said the shooting occurred on the bus as it traveled on Gallatin Pike South near East Webster Street.

A witness told News 4 the shooting happened after a very brief exchange of words. Police said the Hayden had dated a member of Jones' family.

"Witnesses say it wasn't really an argument between the victim and suspect," said Metro police spokesman Don Aaron. "The two exchanged words, very brief words, and the suspect then shot the victim in the chest."

Police said Jones got on the bus with his girlfriend and infant child at the Madison Library. Witnesses said Hayden was already on board. The shooting happen just moments later. 

After the shooting, police said Jones and his girlfriend, who was carrying the infant, ran away in different directions.

Karl Cook was on another MTA bus on Gallatin Pike at the same time across the street.

"I'm scared for my wife because she's pregnant and I don't want to lose my second child," Cook told News 4. "Man, it's just not safe no more for anybody."

MTA spokesperson Amanda Clelland told News 4 that the driver implemented MTA's emergency distress protocol which helped get other passengers off safely and discreetly called the police 

"From the time that the distress protocol was engaged by the operator to Metro Nashville Police Department being on scene, it was less than four minutes of a turn around," Clelland said.

But, House Democrats say it might have been preventable. Last legislative session, democratic lawmakers tried to pass an amendment to current legislation that would have in part banned guns on public buses. Currently only unauthorized weapons are banned, not all firearms. 

"We are open to any conversations that would ensure passenger safety, legislatively or otherwise," Clelland said. 

News 4 asked MTA if they plan to put security officer's on MTA buses like some other cities already do, as they seek to expand. Clelland said it would be speculation right now. 

"I can't speculate, but what we do is we look at our current practices we look at incidents. We review them afterward and try to figure out where are things working and where could we be potentially improve our services," Clelland said.

Jones was driven by a relative to the East Precinct, where he surrendered, according to police. His girlfriend was detained on Due West Avenue.

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