Nashville Zoo's efforts to save endangered alligator snapping tu - WSMV News 4

Nashville Zoo's efforts to save endangered alligator snapping turtle

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Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo
Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo
Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo Courtesy of the Nashville Zoo
NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

The Nashville Zoo has recently announced conservation news, regarding the endangered alligator snapping turtle.

They’re often confused with the common snapping turtle, but is easily distinguished by three large ridges along the back of its shell and its much larger size.

The Nashville Zoo received a four year, $40,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and TWRA to collect, hatch, and raise and release program for North America’s largest freshwater turtle.

The Zoo also received a grant from The Barbara J. Mapp Foundation to support this program in 2016.

They will be collaborating with the TWRA biologist to bring in eggs, raise the babies that hatch from them and release them once they turn three years old. Due to the fact that their chance of surviving greatly increases, because they become too large to be hunted by most predators.

In September, the TWRA flew in 30 hatchlings from Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery in Oklahoma.

The turtles will be raised at the Nashville Zoo, and be monitored after release, to determine the success of the project at different sites.

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