Measles vaccine may have cured Minnesota woman's cancer - WSMV Channel 4

Measles vaccine may have cured Minnesota woman's cancer

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Stacy Erholtz made international news earlier this year after doctors announced her cancer was in remission due to the treatment after enduring the 10 most difficult years of her life. (KARE/CNN) Stacy Erholtz made international news earlier this year after doctors announced her cancer was in remission due to the treatment after enduring the 10 most difficult years of her life. (KARE/CNN)

GOLDEN VALLEY, MN (KARE/CNN) - An experimental cancer treatment is making medical history at The Mayo Clinic, and for one woman, it's given her a second chance at life.

Stacy Erholtz made international news earlier this year after doctors announced her cancer was in remission due to the treatment after enduring the 10 most difficult years of her life.

"I promise you I have not felt this well, I can't remember how well felling like this. Having this amount of energy," Erholtz

Erholtz can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Cancer that attacks the blood nearly stole this mother of three from her children.

"If you go online and read about it I should have left this earth a long, long time ago," she said.

A highly concentrated dose of the measles virus put Erholtz's cancer into remission. The dose was enough to vaccinate 10 million people.

This fall, she will appear on The Doctors television show to discuss her treatment known as virotherapy and whether or not it can be applied to other types of cancer.

"The Mayo Clinic is opening the Phase 2 trial for the measles study. And there is a waiting list for 15 doses of the measles virus. There is well over 350 people on this list," Erholtz said.

But as research continues, her fervent plea is that others battling cancer will experience the happiness she now knows.

"I am filled with joy. I really am. It is interesting because I would say the cancer has made my faith much stronger. And I wouldn't give it back," she said.

It's been more than year since Erholtz had the treatment, however she will have to get tested for the rest of her life to make sure the cancer doesn't return.

Researchers are testing the measles virus to see if it will help other patients or whether it can be applied to other types of cancer.

Copyright 2014 KARE, Stacy Erholtz, The Mayo Clinic via CNN.

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