Detective: Dad 'sexted' other women and showed no emotion after - WSMV Channel 4

UPDATE: Judge: No bond for dad in boy's death in hot SUV

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Justin Ross Harris (left) and his son, Cooper. Justin Ross Harris (left) and his son, Cooper.

UPDATE:

KATE BRUMBACK
Associated Press
    
MARIETTA, Ga. (AP) - A judge has refused to grant bond to a Georgia man charged with murder after his toddler son died inside of a hot SUV.
    
The judge's decision Thursday means Justin Ross Harris will remain in jail. Prosecutors laid out their case against him before that ruling, portraying him as a man who was unhappy in his marriage.
    
A detective also testified that Ross had looked at a website that advocated against having children, and that Ross had exchanged nude photos with several women while his son sat in the hot car.
    
Ross' defense attorney argued there was no evidence the boy was left inside the car intentionally. Attorney Maddox Kilgore says the testimony about the nude photos was simply meant to publicly shame his client.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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By KATE BRUMBACK

Associated Press and MARIETTA, Ga. (AP) 

A detective says the Georgia man charged with murder in his young son's death showed no emotion when he was interviewed by investigators about the toddler's death.

Cobb County Police Detective Phil Stoddard testified at a hearing Thursday for Justin Ross Harris, whose 22-month-old son Cooper died after being left in the hot car. Harris has said he forgot to take the boy to day care. Stoddard says Harris routinely took the boy to day care in the mornings.

Stoddard says Harris' wife came to the day care the afternoon the boy died, June 18, and was told the child wasn't there. According to witnesses, she then said her husband must have left the toddler in the car.

Cobb County Police Detective Phil Stoddard testified at a hearing Thursday about Justin Ross Harris, whose 22-month-old son Cooper died inside the hot car June 18.

Stoddard described evidence that prosecutors say shows that Harris intentionally left the child inside the car. The detective says Harris, who told police he accidentally forgot to take the boy to day care, had been exchanging nude photos with several women the day the child died.

The detective also said Justin Ross Harris and his wife had two life insurance policies for the toddler who died in hot SUV and did an Internet search for "how to survive in prison."

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Scores of reporters and some curious members of the public gathered Thursday at a courthouse in suburban Atlanta for the hearing of a man charged with murder in his 22-month-old son's death in a hot SUV.

Justin Ross Harris was scheduled to appear Thursday afternoon in Cobb County Magistrate Court for a bond and probable cause hearing. He faces murder and child cruelty charges in the June 18 death of his son, Cooper.

Harris has told police he was supposed to drive his son to day care that morning but drove to work without realizing that his son was strapped into a car seat in the back.

Search warrants released over the weekend showed Harris told investigators he had done an online search on what temperature could cause a child's death in a vehicle. The warrant doesn't specify when Harris did the searches.

Police have said facts in the case "do not point toward simple negligence." An arrest warrant said Harris stopped with his son for breakfast and returned to put something inside his car during the day while the child was still inside. The Cobb County Medical Examiner's office said last week that officials believe the child died of hyperthermia - a condition in which the body overheats. The medical examiner has called the death a homicide.

The temperature that day was 88 degrees at 5:16 p.m., according to a warrant filed the day after the child died.

Harris is a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and moved to Georgia in 2012 to work for Home Depot.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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