St. Louis reporter digs deep into human feces for story - WSMV Channel 4

St. Louis reporter digs deep into human feces for story

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© KSDK reporter Elizabeth Matthews digs deep into human feces © KSDK reporter Elizabeth Matthews digs deep into human feces
MASCOUTAH, Ill. -

Elizabeth Matthews, a reporter for KSDK in St. Louis, dug deep - right into human feces - for her story on a rural Illinois farm causing an uproar due to its stench.

The smell of the sewage sludge fertilizer on Shane Reinneck's farm wafts down the roads and prevents neighbors more than a mile away from being able to open their windows, according to those neighbors.

"I hope the wind is blowing that way or that way, and not this way," said Buck Horine, who lives downwind of Reinneck's farm.

Sewage sludge is essentially raw sewage (poop), treated and heated to get rid of harmful pathogens. It's then used to enrich soil.

Even knowing what the fertilizer was made of, Matthews still dug her hand into a pile of it, picked it up, and proceeded to smell it.

"It doesn't smell very good," Matthews said, looking at the camera.

Now that's called being dedicated to your job.

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